Opportunities

This page is designed to help researchers and people looking for research opportunities find each other. We want to make it easier for people to make MND their area of focus and hope that the advancements that come out of these projects will make a positive difference to the MND community.

If you have a vacancy or are looking for a specific opportunity please contact us.

Postgraduate Student Research Project: When does the blood-spinal cord barrier break down in Motor Neuron Disease? Click for more.

Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology
School of Medical Sciences
Auckland University
Honours Project
Ethical Status: Not required

This opportunity is available to students already enrolled or about to enroll in postgraduate programmes at the Faculty of Medical Health Sciences, Auckland University. Please apply directly to Emma Scotter at emma.scotter@auckland.ac.nz.

Topic: When does the blood-spinal cord barrier break down in Motor Neuron Disease?

Supervisors:
Dr Emma Scotter, Senior Research Fellow E: emma.scotter@auckland.ac.nz
Professor Michael Dragunow, Professor (Personal Chair)
Professor Chris Shaw, Professor

Aims

Introduction

Motor neuron disease (MND) is a fatal and incurable movement disorder affecting approximately 1 in 15,000 New Zealanders. Motor neurons within the brain and spinal cord degenerate, causing progressive loss of movement function. In addition to motor neuron death, the blood-brain- and blood-spinal cord-barriers are also leaky in MND. But the relationship between motor neuron death and blood-spinal cord-barrier leakage is poorly understood.

The main supervisor for the study is Dr. Emma Scotter, with co-supervisors Prof. Mike Dragunow, and Prof. Chris Shaw of King’s College London. Prof. Shaw is among the top Motor Neuron Disease research leaders in the world.

The student will be based at the Centre for Brain Research at Grafton Campus. The Centre for Brain Research embraces a unique model of neuroscience that fosters collaboration. Scientists, doctors and students work together at every level; from the laboratory to the clinic to whānau and the community, enabling us to provide novel insights on how the brain stimulates, controls and interacts with the rest of the body.

Objective

This study will utilise tissue collected by our collaborators at King’s College London from a novel transgenic mouse model of Motor Neuron Disease (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26108367). The student will fluorescently stain tissue that was collected across a range of time points, to plot the timing of blood-spinal cord-barrier leakage compared to motor neuron pathology. The study will employ state-of-the-art imaging and automated image analysis techniques.

Skills taught
________________________________________

•       Human brain immunohistochemistry

•       High throughput imaging and image analysis

•       Human brain cell culture

•       Scientific writing

What we are looking for in a successful applicant

We are looking for a high achieving, hard working and collegial student for this exciting project. Please apply directly to Emma Scotter via email to emma.scotter@auckland.ac.nz.

Postgraduate Student Research Project: Mapping blood-brain-barrier leakage in Motor Neuron Disease. Click for more.

Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology
School of Medical Sciences
Auckland University
Honours Project
Ethical Status: Not required

This opportunity is available to students already enrolled or about to enroll in postgraduate programmes at the Faculty of Medical Health Sciences, Auckland University. Please apply directly to Emma Scotter at emma.scotter@auckland.ac.nz.

Topic: When does the blood-spinal cord barrier break down in Motor Neuron Disease?

Supervisors:
Dr Emma Scotter, Senior Research Fellow E: emma.scotter@auckland.ac.nz
Professor Michael Dragunow, Professor (Personal Chair)

Aims

Motor neuron disease (MND) is a fatal and incurable movement disorder affecting approximately 1 in 15,000 New Zealanders. Motor neurons within the brain and spinal cord degenerate, causing progressive loss of movement function. In addition to motor neuron death, the blood-brain- and blood-spinal cord-barriers are also leaky in MND. But the relationship between motor neuron death and blood-brain-barrier leakage is poorly understood.

This study will employ fluorescent staining of bequeathed human brain tissue to test the relationship between the blood-brain-barrier and motor neuron pathology. The study will employ state-of-the-art tissue microarray technology. In addition, the student will be growing pericyte cells of the blood-brain barrier which are derived from human brain tissue, in order to understand their response to and role in blood-brain barrier breakdown.

The student will be based at the Centre for Brain Research at Grafton Campus. The Centre for Brain Research embraces a unique model of neuroscience that fosters collaboration. Scientists, doctors and students work together at every level; from the laboratory to the clinic to whānau and the community, enabling us to provide novel insights on how the brain stimulates, controls and interacts with the rest of the body.

Skills taught
________________________________________

•       Human brain immunohistochemistry

•       High throughput imaging and image analysis

•       Human brain cell culture

•       Scientific writing

What we are looking for in a successful applicant

We are looking for a high achieving, hard working and collegial student for this exciting project. Please apply directly to Emma Scotter via email to emma.scotter@auckland.ac.nz.

ALS Research Forum - Funding Opportunities

The ALS Research Forum has a comprehensive list of funding opportunities available.
Definitely worth a look.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email